Best Essential Oils For Perfume Reviews

​Everyone likes to smell good. This is, for the most part, a fact. If you are a fan of walking into a room and having people turn around and say, “Wow, I wonder what scent they are wearing?” Then maybe it’s time you take a sniff into essential oils.

With hundreds of essences available on the market, parfum lovers will find that there is a handful that works best when it comes to combined fragrances. But before we can get into those, it’s best to learn how it all started.

Best ​Essential Oils For Perfume Comparison

BRAND

DETAILS

  • ​Scent: Spicy, sweet, and metallic
  • ​Notes: Base and top
  • ​Benefits: Calming

​Lavender 

  • ​Scent: Floral
  • ​Notes: Middle
  • ​Benefits: Healing wounds, relaxation

​Patchouli

  • ​Scent: Dark, musky, earthy
  • ​Notes: Base
  • ​Benefits: Moisturizes, clears acne and dandruff

  • ​Scent: Sweet, floral
  • ​Notes: Base
  • ​Benefits: Mood lifter, fades scars

  • Scent: Spicy, rich, warm, deep floral, sweet
  • Note: Base
  • Benefits: Can give skin a youthful glow

​Lemongrass

  • ​Scent: Fresh, earthy
  • ​Note: Top
  • ​Benefits: Relieve muscle pain, kills bacteria

  • ​Scent: Clean, warm, licorice
  • ​Note: Top and Middle
  • ​Benefits: Eases stomach cramps

​Sandalwood

  • ​Scent: Sweet, woodsy
  • ​Note: Base
  • ​Benefits: Anti-inflammatory, relaxing, boosts memory

​Sweet Orange

  • ​Scent: Sweet, orange, citrus
  • ​Note: Top
  • ​Benefits: Mood lifter, help with sleep

​Ylang Ylang

  • ​Scent: Tropical, floral
  • Note: ​Base and middle
  • ​Benefits: Antidepressant, lowers blood pressure

​History Of Perfume

Interestingly enough, fragrances got their start with the discovery of essential oils. Citizens of ancient Egypt were the first to create what we know to be fragrance today. It was used for important religious functions, funerals, and for use on an average day, whatever that would be in ancient Egypt.

It was a luxury only available to the rich. Soon, their aromas and practices spread to Persia, Greece, and Rome. Some of the earlier scents included coriander, myrtle, lavender, and rosemary. Yet, it wasn’t until 1190 AD that liquid scents known as parfum were produced and sold in Paris commercially.

From there, fragrances have become almost as synonymous with movie stars and images of beautiful people showing off their beautiful diamonds on our television screens.

​How Is It Made?

​After I did a little digging, it seems that the standard way of making fragrance in today’s commercial industry is to first extract oils from plants and petals in one of the following ways.

​Steam Distillation

This is a method used to extract essential oils. This process is completed when the flowers or stems that hold the scent the chemist is trying to capture are put into a pot with water and boiled. The steam rises up, moves through a pipe where it is cooled and then it is collected in a container at the other end. The natural oil of the host plant typically floats on top of the water and it is separated. This is identical to the process used by top essential oil producers.

​Solvent Extraction

This process is completed when the flower in question, jasmine, for example, are too delicate for the steam distillation process. Basically, the flower or plant material is broken apart. Then it is covered in a solvent like hexane, which is a colorless liquid hydrocarbon of the alkane series.

What does that mean? For someone like you and me, it’s enough to know that they are “significant constituents of gasoline.”

​It is also used as a cleaning solvent and an industrial degreaser. So, it’s pretty strong stuff. The flowers are coated with it and the hexane, or another solvent like it, and it breaks down leaving what is known as an absolute oil. They differ from essential oils simply because of the process in which they are extracted.

​Expression

This method, also known as “cold pressing,” is also a process used to extract essential oils. It is used primarily for citrus oils like lime, bergamot, and sweet orange. When this process was first started, the method used sponges. Now, it involves a bunch of spikes poking and tearing open the rind to release the oils.

​Maceration

This method is another form of solvent extraction. This time, it is a powdered crude drug that mixes with the solvent. After three days of steeping and agitation, the solid particles are strained, and later through decantment, the essence is captured.

​Enfleurage

This process, which is also a way to capture essential oils, was discovered in the 19th century. The petals of the fragrant flower are covered in a fat or vegetable oil, and through the fact that essential oils dissolve in fats, the essences are extracted from the petals into the oil. Back in the 19th and 20th century, mainly animal fats were used but that has changed over the years to vegetable or palm oil.

​After Extraction

​Once the scents are extracted, they are mixed according to a formula created by the “nose” or master fragrance creator. Simply put, there are base notes, heart or middle notes, and top notes. Base notes are added first, then middle or heart, and then the top, just as their names indicate.

​Then they are further mixed with alcohol, the quantity of which depends on the fragrance. Colognes seem to have the most alcohol and toilet waters the least. After that, they are aged and sold as their signature scent.

​The Difference Between The Two

​As someone who is a purchaser of both products, essential oils and fragrances, I would say there are quite a few differences.

​Essential Oils

These are pure essences from the host plant. They are volatile compounds that are extracted through one of several ways we listed above. Because of their purity, they are extremely strong and should be diluted well before applying directly to your skin. When used correctly, essential oils can offer a lot of health benefits from easing anxiety to pain relief.

​Fragra​​​​​nce

​There are mixtures of essential oils or absolute oils, which we explained earlier, along with alcohol or water mixed. While they contain essential oils in some cases, I have personally never seen any advertisement for a fragrance that pointed out any health benefits. They are usually sold in association with wealth, love, and sex.

Not all fragrances are made with essential oils. Some use absolute oils and some use synthetic fragrances, which can be harmful.

Both essential oils and fragrances can be bought inexpensively or at prices that give you sticker shock. With both of them, most of the time, you get what you pay for.

How is essential oil used as a fragrance?

What do you consider when choosing essential oils for fragrance?

Top ​10 Essential Oils For Perfume Reviews

​Neroli

  • ​Scent: Spicy, sweet, and metallic
  • ​Notes: Base and top
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    ​Benefits: Calming

​I love this oil mostly because of its name. It reminds me of an Egyptian queen who got married to the pharaoh while wearing the most beautiful gowns that are adorned in gold. As complex as that description was, so is the fragrance. It smells a bit like honey in its sweetness yet it has metallic undertones and a hint of spice.

PROS

  • Exotic
  • ​Has a calming effect
  • ​Can be used as two notes

CONS

  • ​Is a blend already
  • ​Expensive when bought pure

​Who Should Buy This?

​Anyone looking for an exotic scent should give Neroli a try as a fragrance. It can be used as a base note or top note depending on the other oils chosen to use in the blend. It can have a calming effect as an essential oil.

​Lavender

  • ​Scent: Floral
  • ​Notes: Middle
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    ​Benefits: Healing wounds, relaxation

​One of my favorite oils and a constant staple in my repertoire, lavender oil is flowery and sweet, which is imperative when it comes to combining fragrances. Not only that, lavender can give you a sense of relaxation when you need it most.

PROS

  • ​Least toxic oil
  • ​Amazing floral scent
  • ​A little goes a long way

CONS

  • ​Pet careful with lavender around pets
  • ​Can be diluted if not bought from a reputable source.

Who Should Purchase?

​This product can be used every day. I know this because there was a time when I never left my house without applying some lavender oil. This one is safe enough to use undiluted, but if you are trying to blend some scents, then use a good carrier like jojoba oil, which can help your blend last longer.

​Patchouli

  • ​Scent: Dark, musky, earthy
  • ​Notes: Base
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    ​Benefits: Moisturizes, clears acne and dandruff

​This bouquet has somehow become synonymous with a phenomenon known as hippies. This may be because that’s when the free love and peace movement came over the Western world, patchouli became increasingly popular. It is said the odor is so potent that it covered the smell of marijuana, which was more illegal then than it is now. One of my good friends swears by it, and the sweet, dark, musky aroma always reminds me of her.

PROS

  • ​Unique scent
  • ​Works well with other essences
  • ​Has strong benefits

CONS

  • ​Strong scent
  • ​Could be diluted if not purchased from a reputable source

Who Should Purchase?

​Anyone who has an inner hippie inside of them should try this oil as a scent. My good friend swears by it because she loves earthy and musky scents. It is a strong scent so use sparingly at first.

Jasmine

  • ​Scent: Sweet, floral
  • ​Notes: Base
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    ​Benefits: Mood lifter, fades scars

​This is a popular oil that some people like to wear alone after it is diluted with a carrier substance. Its floral aroma is sweet and makes a great addition to any homemade fragrances. It has a rich odor and reminds us of flowers blooming.

PROS

  • ​Popular scent
  • ​Works well in combinations with other essential oils
  • ​Is sweet smelling

CONS

  • ​Some people are allergic
  • ​Be wary of suppliers who dilute pure oils

Who Should Purchase?

​The scent lover who likes things to smell sweet would love adding jasmine to their essential oil collection. Typically used as a base note, this is a floral scent loved by many.

​Rose

  • ​Scent: Spicy, rich, warm, deep floral, sweet
  • ​Note: Base
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    ​Benefits: Can give skin a youthful glow

​If you are a romantic of any level, then you know what this passionate aroma smells like. As a woman who is all about independence and not fitting into a stereotype or mold, I have to say that I love the smell of rose. It’s no surprise that the extract is making its way into parfums since the flower it is extracted from what is considered one of the world’s most delightful blossom.

PROS

  • ​A warm scent that most people love
  • ​Can be used as a lone fragrance when diluted correctly
  • ​Can spark feelings of love

CONS

  • ​Is strong
  • ​Can get a diluted bottle if you don’t use a reputable source

Who Should Purchase?

Anyone in love with love should have some rose oil in their collection. As the name indicates, this oil smells like a rose. It is typically used as a base note in commercially created fragrances.

​Lemongrass

  • ​Scent: Fresh, earthy
  • ​Note: Top
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    ​Benefits: Relieve muscle pain, kills bacteria

​The name of this oil gives the aroma away. It contains the aroma of lemon and the freshness that comes with it. On top of that, you get the earthy tones underneath.

PROS

  • ​Fresh, earthy scent
  • ​Blends well with other essential oils
  • ​Has many health benefits

CONS

  • ​Can be pungent
  • ​Is strong so dilute well

Who Should Purchase?

​This scent is for anyone who likes a clean smell. Lemongrass is primarily used as a top note, which is the first thing you smell when you buy a commercial scent.

​Basil

  • ​Scent: Clean, warm, licorice
  • ​Note: Top and Middle
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    ​Benefits: Eases stomach cramps

​The name of this oil may remind you of Caprese salad, which consists of sliced tomatoes, fresh mozzarella cheese, and fresh basil. Herby in its aroma, basil will add warmth and spice to a fragrance.

PROS

  • ​Clean, herby scent
  • ​Activates mental alertness
  • ​Battles anxiety

CONS

  • ​Is strong so dilute well

Who Should Purchase?

​This is clean scent as well with hints of licorice. If these scents appeal to you, then this is an oil you should add.

​Sandalwood

  • ​Scent: Sweet, woodsy
  • ​Note: Base
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    ​Benefits: Anti-inflammatory, relaxing, boosts memory.

​The name of this fragrance gives its aroma away. Yet, while the smell of wood may not sound appealing, this essence has a light wood smell with an earthy base. This volatile compound is steam distilled from the wood of sandalwood trees that had the time to mature. The best sandalwood is derived from the Indian version of the tree, which has the scientific name Santalum album.

PROS

  • ​Natural aphrodisiac
  • ​Calming
  • ​Works well with other scents

CONS

  • Can be diluted if not purchased from a reputable source

Who Should Purchase?

​Anyone who likes earthy yet sweet scents should consider having this. It’s great as an additive to a blend so if you are getting creative, this is a great oil to work with.

​Sweet Orange

  • ​Scent: Sweet, orange, citrus
  • ​Note: Top
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    ​Benefits: Mood lifter, help with sleep

​When putting your nose near an open bottle of sweet orange oil, you will get an aroma just like you might expect. It is sweet and smells like an orange. While that description might seem like a cop out, it isn’t. Tell me, how would you describe the fragrance of an orange? It is difficult to do because the aroma is so unique to the source it comes from. Just like the word orange is impossible to rhyme, the scent is indescribable unless you’ve taken a whiff yourself.

PROS

  • ​Sweet and clean smelling
  • ​Can make you happy
  • ​Blends well with other fragrances

CONS

  • ​Be wary of sources, only purchase from reputable manufacturers
  • ​Can cause burns if put on the skin and then expose it to the sun

Who Should Purchase?

​If you are a fan of citrus oils, then you should definitely treat yourself to a bottle of sweet orange. It’s refreshing and clean smelling and blends well with other scents like lavender.

​Ylang Ylang

  • ​Scent: Tropical, floral
  • ​Note: Base and middle
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    ​Benefits: Antidepressant, lowers blood pressure

​Here we have another oil that has an aroma that is as unique as its name, and it’s used in a lot of wearable aromas. I bet if you look into the ingredients of your favorite store-bought smells, you might find ylang ylang in the list. It is a major ingredient in the infamous Chanel No. 5. As with any other essence extracted from nature, this oil has a wide array of health benefits including stress relief.

PROS

  • ​Unique scent
  • ​Invigorating
  • ​Blends well with other scents

CONS

  • ​Can be diluted if not bought from a reputable source

Who Should Purchase?

​If you are interested in trying a new scent, then this could be a good choice for you. It has a floral scent that is slight and is used in plenty of cosmetics sold on the market. Personally, I own this scent and find it invigorating and warm.

To Conclude

​The fact is, essential oils go all the way back to the beginning of fragrances, and the industry wouldn’t be where it is today without our ancestors experimenting with oils extracted from the roots, flowers, bark, and stems around them.

These are not the only oils that would work wonderfully for your own homemade scent. There are so many other options available the possibilities are endless. If you have any suggestions on what oils would work great in a fragrance, please leave us a comment below.

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